Ramon Lopez de la Vega

Ramon Lopez de la Vega

I have been teaching chemistry for the past 39 years. I have taught over many different courses over the years but I consider my area to be Inorganic Chemistry. When I first began teaching I was just told what material to cover, and I did. I have developed my own way of teaching never having been formally trained as an educator. I find many of the concepts spoken about in the workshop I already implement to a large degree. I just did not know what to call them. Other parts of the material are totally new to me; these I find the most useful.  I have joined this program in order to learn more about myself as an educator and thereby improve the techniques I utilize in order to ensure…
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David Chatfield

David Chatfield

I am a professor of chemistry and have a research program in macromolecular modeling (current favorite enzymes are topoisomerase and chloroperoxidase).  My bread-and-butter teaching is all things physical chemistry. As FIU has grown, so has the PChem II class size, and with it, the number of students who just don’t seem to get it.  I’ve gotten an itch to do something about that, and so I’m pleased to be part of this group. My colleagues who also teach the course are interested in how it goes, so if I’m able to make some improvements, they just might outlast me.  More broadly, I began thinking about teaching innovation at the upper division level when I was department chair. I would like to see what might be done, and if it is…
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Vinod Kumarappan

Vinod Kumarappan

Vinod Kumarappan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physics at Kansas State University. He is an experimentalist working in the area of atomic, molecular and optical physics, where his primary research interest is exploring and understanding the time-dependent quantum mechanics of small molecules using ultrafast laser pulses. His current focus is on aligning and orienting gas-phase molecules in space to enable molecular-frame measurements. His teaching interests include upper-level electromagnetic and quantum theory as well as introductory physics for engineering and physics majors.
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Andy Krause

Andy Krause

Andy Krause is a teaching specialist in the Department of Mathematics at Michigan State University.  He earn a MS in Mathematics and is Ph.D. Candidate in Mathematics Education at Michigan State University. Andy teaches a variety of introductory mathematics courses and provides professional development for undergraduate, graduate, post-doc, and faculty instructors in the department. He is also involved in a variety of curriculum development and educational inquiry projects targeted at improving introductory courses. Andy's research focuses on understanding students' learning experiences with reformed curriculum to inform ongoing development.
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Valerie Hedges

Valerie Hedges

Valerie Hedges is an assistant professor in the Neuroscience Program at Michigan State University. She attended John Carroll University and received her PhD at The University of Minnesota studying the neural mechanisms of motivated behavior. During her postdoctoral research, she served as an instructor of record for a large neuroscience course. This experience, combined with her work on a NIH-funded project focused on neuroscience education in high school classrooms, furthered her interests in STEM education. Valerie took a position as an assistant professor at Northern Michigan University 2014-2017 before joining MSU in the fall of 2017. Valerie teaches NEU301 and NEU302, the large required introductory courses for neuroscience majors. She is also one of the instructors for NEU311L, the required laboratory course for upper-level neuroscience majors. In her courses, Valerie…
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Ryan Maccombs

Ryan Maccombs

Ryan Maccombs received his M.S. in Mathematics from Michigan State University and now works there as a Teaching Specialist. Ryan's main duties including running and teaching in the core calculus sequence. Ryan is interested in using technology to improve large lecture courses including flipping lectures with the use of videos, course forums, engaging/interactive large lectures, and personalized email communication with students. In Ryan's free time he enjoys playing frisbee, tennis, and board games. He is currently in the process of starting a non-profit cat cafe in East Lansing with his wife.
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Rachel Barnard

Rachel Barnard

Rachel Barnard is a teaching specialist in the chemistry group in the Lyman Briggs College at Michigan State University. She has a masters and doctorate in chemistry from the University of Michigan. During her post-doc at the University of Michigan, she was a part of an effort to work across seven science and math departments to incorporate evidence-based instructional practices. At LBC, Rachel teaches the two-semester General Chemistry lab and lecture course series (LB 171 / 171L / 172 / 172L) and oversees 40 Undergraduate Learning Assistants. In her courses, students explore the fundamental ideas and practices of chemistry. Recent curriculum development projects have included incorporating more scaffolded opportunities to develop particulate-level reasoning and metacognition in the lecture courses. Rachel works to include the Undergraduate Learning Assistants as authentic members…
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Krystyna Kijewska

Krystyna Kijewska

Krystyna Kijewska is an academic specialist/instructor in the Department of Chemistry and holds a Doctorate Degree of Chemistry from the University of Warsaw, Poland. Krystyna teaches courses CEM 141 (General Chemistry) and CEM 142 (General & Inorganic Chemistry). She is part of a team of instructors that apply the CLUE (Chemistry, Life, Universe and Everything) approach. The CLUE program focuses on the three-dimensional teaching and learning model – core ideas in chemistry, crosscutting concepts and scientific practices. In her lectures, she employs active learning approaches, such as active participation (iClicker questions, real-time feedback, group activities), which help students to effectively and efficiently think about presented material. During her lectures, she discourages rote memorization. Instead, she encourages students to relate concepts and theory to build and reinforce their knowledge.
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Jenny Taylor

Jenny Taylor

Jenny Taylor is an academic specialist in the Neuroscience Program at Michigan State University. Prior to coming to MSU, she attended Adrian College and then earned her PhD at Wayne State University. She went on to complete postdoctoral training at the University of Michigan, where her research focused on Parkinson’s Disease. She began her teaching career by overseeing undergraduate researchers in the laboratory and by teaching classes in research and writing.    Jenny has been teaching NEU311L, the required laboratory course and upper level writing course for neuroscience majors, since 2012.  Students attempt to replicate published findings reported in the primary literature for several topics. They examine the effects of lavender oil on brain waves in fellow students, of a drug on movement in a fruit fly model of Parkinson’s disease,…
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Daniel Rolles

Daniel Rolles

I am an assistant professor in the Physics Department at Kansas State University working in the field of experimental atomic and molecular physics and currently teaching physics classes mostly at the introductory and upper-division undergraduate level. My research uses femtosecond lasers, both traditional table-top systems in our lab at KSU as well as large-scale X-ray lasers at international research facilities like SLAC in Stanford or DESY in Hamburg/Germany, to take movies of molecules that undergo chemical reactions. By studying the motion of atoms or even individual electrons while sunlight is converted into energy or one molecules is transformed into another, I hope to contribute towards developing cleaner and more efficient energy sources and to understand some of the fundamental reactions that govern our daily life and the world around us.…
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